Asthma is an allergic infection of the lungs, which is usually triggered by pollens, molds, dust, animal dander, air pollution, chemicals, exercise, temperature changes or ingestion of certain foods. During an asthma attack the walls of the lungs turn out to be swollen and the mucus membranes fill with fluid and thick, sticky mucus making it hard to breathe. Asthma symptoms can include a scratchy throat, coughing, shortness of breath, wheezing and a tight feeling in the chest. An asthma attack can be mild, moderate or severe and lasting for a few minutes, hours, or even several days. People with asthma should have an asthma action plan. An asthma action plan lets you and your doctor to make a personalized plan for controlling your asthma.

The main key to understanding and controlling asthma is to know yourself. One person may get a severe asthma reaction from a minor whiff of perfume, while another asthma sufferer has no reaction at all to the very similar trigger. Everyone who suffers from asthma is unique and is affected differently so the asthma action plan should be tailor plan which helps you manage your asthma.

Knowing when to get emergency help for a severe attack can save your life. If you are experiencing the following, you should look for immediate medical attention:

you have intense difficulty breathing, talking and walking,
your chest folds tight and your ribs are dropped inward as you breathe,
your medication does not control your symptoms
your fingernails or lips are turning blue,
your nostrils flare when you breathe

Very often things that we have eaten, used or are a part of our surroundings for years can unexpectedly become asthma triggers. Because there are so many variables involved that affect getting control of your asthma, the first thing you should do is keep a notebook as a part of your asthma action plan. This will help you identify your triggers. Once you recognize what they are, you can either take away these triggers or reduce them as much as possible.

Some people have both food and environmental triggers or allergies that they are unaware of. This can make determining specific triggers and controlling asthma symptoms much more complex, so keeping a notebook as a part of your asthma action plan is important. If you find that you are feeling asthmatic after consuming some food or drink, one of those things could be the culprit, but because you have also ate a few things during the day, it's not always easy to know what it was that caused the difficulty. If you evidence details of everything that was eaten every time you experienced asthma symptoms, you'll see a pattern developing, which will help you to discover exactly what your trigger is. Once you determine your triggers, you can then begin to eliminate them or reduce them as much as possible. This will help bring your asthma under control and help lessen your asthma symptoms.

Combining these measures with a good diet, stress reduction and natural supplements that help eliminate allergy and asthma symptoms as well as creating good asthma action plan will ensure an active, healthy life.